Withdrawal Agreement Bill Second Reading

Withdrawal Agreement Bill Second Reading


On Wednesday, the House of Commons rejected the five amendments by separate votes by a significant majority and sent the original bill back to the House of Lords. It could have started with a parliamentary ping-pong game where other versions of the law went back and forth between the two houses, until they agreed on a version. But faced with the Conservatives` 80-seat majority in the House of Commons, the House of Lords accepted and approved the bill yesterday in its original form without a vote. The House of Commons supported an earlier bill at second reading in October; but rejected the Prime Minister`s plan to bring him down by Parliament within days, prompting him to push for parliamentary elections. On November 13, 2017, Brexit Minister David Davis announced a new bill to enshrine the withdrawal agreement in national law through primary legislation. In further talks in the House of Commons, Davis said that if the UK decided not to pass the law on 29 March 2019, the UK would remain on track to leave the EU without a deal, having invoked Article 50 in March 2017, following the adoption of the Notification of Withdrawal Act 2017. [7] On January 22, 2020, the bill was passed by the House of Lords without further amendment. The next day she obtained royal approval. [14] After Prime Minister Boris Johnson and the Conservatives won 365 of the 650 seats in the House of Commons in the 12 December election, it was clear that the House of Representatives would quickly approve the withdrawal agreement by tabling the bill at first reading on 19 December, just after the debate on the Queen`s Speech that opened the new Parliament. , and approved it at second reading on 20 December by 358 votes to 234. On 9 January, it received its third and final reading, was approved by 330-231 votes and sent to the House of Lords. But the Conservatives promised in their election platform that there would be no extension of the transition period, and Johnson reiterated that promise on numerous occasions during the election campaign.

The bill, which came into force yesterday, removes a clause in the previous version that gave Members the right to authorize the extension of the transition period and replace it with a new clause prohibiting any extension of the transposition period. It defines the closing date of the implementation period as 31 December 2020 to 11 .m. Charles Michel, President of the European Council, welcomed the vote and tweeted that it was an “important step in the process of ratifying Article 50”. He added that “equal conditions of competition remain a must for all future relations.” He recalled the EU`s call for fair competition in exchange for a free trade agreement with zero tariffs and zero quotas. He told MPs that the bill “will not protect or strengthen our rights, nor will it support our processing industry or our important business relationships. […] I consider that the government`s removal of the protection of unaccompanied children seeking asylum in this bill is an absolute disgrace. This ensures that the UK will remain in line with EU climate, environmental and workers` rights conventions in a future trade agreement. The bill was reintroduced immediately after the general election and was the first bill introduced in the House of Commons in the first session of the 58th Parliament[5] with amendments to the previous bill by the re-elected government and was read for the first time on December 19, just after the first reading of the Outlawries Bill and before the start of the debate on the Queen`s Speech.

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